JorZine - Kataklysm - Waiting for the End to Come

Kataklysm - Waiting for the End to Come

Label: Nuclear Blast

Reviewer: Manel Lilioth - 2013-11-06

Band profile | Official website | Order online

Rating
7.6/10
CompositionMusicianshipProductionArtworkOriginality
8/10 9/10 7/10 7/10 7/10

Highlights:  Empire of Dirt, Kill The Elite

Why Quebecers are barebones to have a death scene as active, large and exciting? Is it a response to their reputation as a country to pop singers? (Admit it, you know!) Although in the first place when it comes to the Quebec death scene you immediately think Quo Vadis, Martyr, Augury, or Gorguts, Beyond Creation, we must not forget that veterans Kataklysm training still goes to 1992. They are back this year with a new album, simply titled Waiting for the end to Come. Hope, however, that there is no hidden message behind the future of that death metal soup.

 

 

Now signed to Nuclear Blast, our Quebecers still operate in a melodic death metal, strongly reminiscent of the Swedish Gothenburg scene and artists such as Arch Enemy, In Flames early years or Dan Swano. This new album is no exception to the rule. In fact, besides the big crushing riffs (Nuclear Blast requires) systematically the compositions take the form of songs, combining melody and greasy growl “Dead & Buried”. The melodies are quickly assimilated that stick easily in your head and you find yourself singing the lyrics “Open the gates of Hell” to “Fire” or “We Live to Dominate” on “Like Animals”. No doubt songs like “Fire” or “If I was God, I'd burn it all” (the first two of the album and the top two) are made to the screaming crowds in concert with their groovy rhythm their sense of melody and words easy to assimilate.

 

Some songs are more direct like "The Darkest Days of Slumber", where the impression of facing a giant wall of sound and solid feel ... is to refrain. In reality, the problem is precisely that the majority of the pieces are constructed the same way. The song structures have strong verses and very melodic choruses; “Real Blood - Real Scars” is particularly uninspired though. Apart from these few flaws, listeners seeking a powerful sound will appreciate this new studio effort.

 

As we all admit specially ones who work in music industry that the Production is in the image of the groups named above Swedish, massive and cold, which does not typically help in returning to the world of the first sight band. The drums and guitar are very forward, which reinforces the impression of the sound barrier, the hallmark of Kataklysm. The song is powerful Maurizio Iacono (a growl of this quality there, deep and powerful it does not get everywhere) and at the other hand Jean-Francois Dagenais (guitar) is illustrated by his catchy melodies. Unfortunately, this groove on the first two songs on the album fades gradually to give way to rhythm a little bit “The Promise”. The faster passages are welcome “Empire of Dirt” or “Kill The Elite” and break some of the monotony album (most pieces is mid / up tempo, despite Max Duhamel (drums) uses double pedal galore).

 

Overall, this is a very decent album, even quality, despite some minor flaws scattered here and there. With a shorter duration (though the album lasts 45 minutes) and a little more variety in the compositions, we could hang all the more.

Still waiting to see how the band will defend his new album on stage. Note that they all will pass this year on tour with Fleshgod Apocalypse in the first part, then at Hellfest, two appointments not to be missed for fans of death. “Open the gates of Hell”!

 

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